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NZ: 500 enter strip club breast job competition (Auckland)

Publish Date: 19 Jan 2012
Source: Fairfax NZ News
By: Jessica Tasman-Jones

Women competing to win a breast augmentation from an Auckland strip club could end up with a booby prize if they suffer surgery complications, a body image group says.

Next month the Calendar Girls "Win Silicones" competition begins, where up to 10 women could be awarded the cosmetic procedure free of charge.

...heats which will involve an amateur strip and "best butt" competition. Judges and Calendar Girls patrons will decide the winner.

Director Jacqui Le Prou says more than 500 women have registered for the heats which will involve an amateur strip and "best butt" competition.

Judges and Calendar Girls patrons will decide the winner.

EDEN, a non-profit organisation that promotes body acceptance and diversity, says up to 90 per cent of people who get breast augmentation suffer some form of complication.

Agency manager Deb Schwarz questions whether Calendar Girls will pay for follow-up visits to a doctor if a patient suffers pain, sensitivity or leaks.

She says around 85 per cent of women who don't suffer complications feel better about their appearance after surgery.

For those who do experience problems the opposite is true, Schwarz says.

She is also concerned entrants, many of whom will already be suffering from body dissatisfaction, will have to parade their bodies in front of an audience to win.

She says it is important for potential patients to "deal with the fact that often when we change the outside we don't necessarily deal with the issues on the inside".

"I think the fact advertisements are on during the middle of the day when young people are listening sends a strong and dangerous message to young people about what's okay in terms of the objectification of women."

EDEN recommends women interested in breast augmentation get counselling and support to work out what options are best for them.

"We'd be concerned this is being handed out as a competition prize rather than as a considered decision whereby counselling and support is available."

Schwarz is also disappointed the event is being promoted on seven radio stations and the Calendar Girls website.

"I think the fact advertisements are on during the middle of the day when young people are listening sends a strong and dangerous message to young people about what's okay in terms of the objectification of women."

She says the competition sent the message women should change how they look even if it involves surgery.

Le Prou says terms and conditions are yet to be finalised and disputes the fact most women suffer complications from breast augmentation.

"Everyone I know who's had a boob job hasn't had any problems if they've gone to a proper New Zealand surgeon."

She says organisers are seeking expressions of interest at this stage and will interview potential competitors in a fortnight.

"The ones who have commented why they want to do it have said they've just wanted them for a really, really long time and this is their opportunity because they've never been able to afford it."

Le Prou had earlier said she'd like to see breast cancer survivors enter the competition but says none have applied yet that she knows of.

According to Medical Council guidelines, it is not appropriate for doctors and surgeons to offer medical treatments as prizes for commercial or financial gain.

However, Le Prou says winners get to chose their own surgeon and Calendar Girls simply pays the bill.

"For their surgeon, it's just another person wanting to get their boobs done, they have to go through the same medical checks, have to get questioned.

"It's no different except someone else is paying for it."

Heats will take place every Wednesday from the end of February.
 

Copyright © 2012 Fairfax New Zealand Limited
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